Stovetop: Punjabi Split Moong Dal


May 14, 2020

Bread › StoveTop ›

YOU KNOW HOW TO MAKE DAL. BUT, DO YOU KNOW HOW TO EAT IT? 
And, no smarty pants. I do not mean with a spoon. Making Indian food is one thing. Knowing how to piece it together into a delicious multi-layered masterpiece is another. Just look at that mouth-watering photo above. My website and recipes are here to help. First, though, let me address split and skinned moong dal or duhli moong. Whenever you see the word duhli on packaging, it indicates a legume is 'washed' - no skin and usually split. Duhli moong, or yellow moong, comes from the whole green moong bean. But, when the skin is taken off and it is split in half it looks yellow like this. Chances are, if you are newer to Indian cuisine, you have yet to come across this form of moong. It's not readily available in mainstream grocers. Why many non-Indian bloggers that dabble in Indian cuisine don't make it or showcase it. And, precisely why I included it among our product offerings. It was important for me to get this story out there. In our Punjabi culture, this is hands down the most commonly eaten dal. My father-in-law was notorious for wanting his moong dal every Monday night without fail. It's not only fast-cooking, but it's also very easy to digest, which makes it perfect over basmati rice with a simple onion salad on the side. Yellow moong is at once light and filling. It has a brighter taste profile than the red lentils commonly found in U.S. markets that are called masoor dal, which actually cook up yellow and have an earthier taste profile. Both are delicious in their own way, but yellow moong has and always will have a special place in my heart. Try it for yourself. 

RECIPE

Stovetop: Punjabi Yellow Moong Dal

1 cup duhli moong dal (dried, split, and skinned green dal), picked over and
                                       washed (they look yellow)
4 cups of water
1 tablespoon vegetable oil or ghee
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 small yellow onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (2-inch) piece of ginger, minced
1-4 fresh Thai, serrano, or cayenne chiles, stems removed, finely chopped
2 teaspoons garam masala
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 teaspoon red chile powder
2 teaspoons salt

In a large pot, add yellow moong and water. Bring to a boil and then simmer until cooked through with the lid on and slightly ajar. The ratio here is 1 to 4. One cup of product to 4 cups of water. 

In a separate pan, prepare the tarka. Heat the oil on medium-high heat. Add cumin and turmeric. Cook until the seeds sizzle, about 1 minute. 

Add onion. Cook until slightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add garlic and ginger. Cook another minute. The garlic and ginger can be ground down together in a food processor. Add chiles. Cook another minute. 

Transfer this mixture to the cooking/cooked dal. Stir. Add garam masala, coriander powder, red chile powder, and salt. Stir. 

Simmer until all of your ingredients come together. If the mixture looks too thick, add a little water. If it looks too thin, cook it down a bit more. The consistency should be like porridge. 

Serve garnished with a pinch of raw, diced onion; thinly sliced green chiles; chopped fresh cilantro; a touch of ghee or butter; and, a hint of Indian achaar (pickle). These touches are what will take your dal from good to electrifying. Give it a try and let me know what you think. Usually, folks don't realize how much of a difference this post-cooking layering actually makes. Eat over basmati rice or with Indian bread like roti or naanI often eat it like a soup. 

Watch this video for step-by-step instructions on how to make the recipe above. For more videos, subscribe to my YouTube channel and tune in Live on Facebook Indian As Apple Pie  Monday through Friday at 11 am CST (Chicago time). When you tune in Live, you can post your questions and comments as well. 

 



Anupy Singla
Anupy Singla

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